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CCG/6102 National Standard Operating Procedure (NSOP)
518 COVID-19 - Cleaning and Disinfection Routine of the Workplace

Original: 2020-06-04 Revised: n/a Approved by Julie Gascon, Director General, Operations, on June 6, 2020.

The measures recommended in this document are formulated in light of the scientific data available to date and the recommendations of experts of recognized international authorities concerning COVID-19. They are adjusted regularly according to the evolution of the epidemiological situation and new knowledge on the transmissibility of this virus. Given the evolution of information on several aspects of COVID-19, modifications to previously issued recommendations are now being made. Such an approach is part of a risk management process aimed at ensuring the safety of staff and users by optimizing the use of available resources.

Purpose

This National Standard Operating Procedure (NSOP) is intended to be a complete guide for cleaning and disinfecting of various Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) workplaces that are not maintained by cleaning contractors during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Workplace is defined as CCG facilities (such as vessels, bases, stations, centres), government vehicles (including cars, vans, tractors, forklifts, etc.), shared facilities with other partners (such as joint rescue coordination centres), and CCG helicopters and small crafts.

Every department is encouraged to create a checklist of all cleaning items that are deemed relevant to their workplace. The list of items and spaces you will find in this NSOP is extensive but may not contain all items and spaces.

General information

General information for cleaning personnel
Step Information
1. The risk when cleaning is not the same as the risk when face to face with a sick person who may be coughing or sneezing.
2. It is not yet known how long the virus causing COVID-19 lives on surfaces, however, early evidence suggests it can live on objects and surfaces from a few hours to a few days (see step 9 below for more details).
3. Cleaning staff should avoid touching their face, especially their mouth, nose, and eyes when cleaning.
4. Cleaning staff should wash their with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60-95% alcohol before donning and after doffing all personal protective equipment (PPE) items.
5. The use of face protection and eye protection acts as barriers to people inadvertently touching their face with contaminated hands and fingers, whether gloved or not. They also provide protection in case of splashing of the chemical solution used for cleaning/disinfecting.
6. The key to minimizing contamination is to effectively disinfect commonly used locations and items; surfaces frequently touched with hands are the most likely to be contaminated. These include doorknobs, handrails, elevator buttons, light switches, cabinet handles, faucet handles, tables, countertops, and electronics. See step 3 of the table below (individual and collective responsibilities in the workplace) for an extensive list.
7. COVID-19 is a respiratory virus that is present in the droplets produced when someone coughs, sneezes or talks. It is not present in sweat or other biological fluids.
8. In general, COVID-19 does not survive on objects for a long period:
  • 3 hours on objects with dry surfaces
  • 6 days on objects with wet surfaces
9. In particular, recent experimental data indicates that survival time may depend on the type of surface. The virus could be present for:
  • 4 hours on copper
  • 24 hours on cardboard
  • more than 48 hours (2 days) on stainless steel
  • 72 hours (3 days) on plastic
Note: No relevant data is currently available for textiles.

Procedures

Individual and collective responsibilities in the workplace
Step Procedure
1.

Cleaning of office space assigned to an individual. This includes but is not limited to: computer and all peripherals, phone, desk surface and chair.

2.

Daily cabin cleaning

  1. To eliminate the risk completely, during the pandemic of COVID-19, it is recommended that each individual should be in charge of their own daily cleaning and disinfecting of the surfaces in their cabin.
  2. If that is not possible, the person cleaning the cabin should use proper PPE (such as gloves, long sleeve gown when making beds) if they suspect they can be in contact with any surfaces that have been directly in contact with or have been exposed to respiratory droplets.
  3. Cleaning one's own cabin includes, but is not limited to:
    1. 3.1. sweep, vacuum, and wash decks and carpets when needed
    2. 3.2. regularly disinfect bulkheads and deckheads, bunks, settees and chairs, desks, closets and other surfaces, TVs, remotes, and other electronic equipment
    3. 3.3. make one's own bed, change one's own sheets (put dirty bedsheets in a plastic bag, sealed)
3.

Workplace cleaning

  1. Frequent specific points to clean in the workplace include, but are not limited to:
    1. 1.1. office and common areas: touch points, doors, light switches, light switch plates, waiting room furniture and foyer surfaces, door handles, thermostats, lobby reception areas / security stations / public waiting areas, desk surfaces, pens, door handles, public telephones, chairs (armrests and chair levers), and pass readers
    2. 1.2. washrooms: faucets, plunger handles, soap dispenser levers, towel dispensers, toilet seats, disposal bin covers and lids, waste receptacles and door handles, flush handles, light switches, soap dispenser levers, towel dispenser levers, hand dryer buttons, exit door handles and locks, touch points on washroom stall doors and entrance doors, and floors
    3. 1.3. elevators and escalators: passenger elevators and push buttons, loading/shipping dock (rails, push buttons, overhead door handle in freight elevator, and escalator handrails
    4. 1.4. conference rooms, meeting rooms, interview rooms, training rooms: table tops, chairs (armrests and chair levers), waste baskets and recycling bins, window sills, tables and/or desk surfaces, drawer/cabinet handles, and television remote controls
    5. 1.5. kitchens, kitchenettes, lunchrooms and drinking fountains: kitchen/break areas (counters, cupboard handles, fridge handle, microwave handle and buttons, coffee pots and buttons, vending machines and buttons, water coolers and buttons), drinking fountains, and floors
    6. 1.6. photocopy and equipment rooms: hard surface areas, and touch points
    7. 1.7. emptying of waste baskets and recycling bins: empty them before they are full to avoid spill and cross-contamination
  2. Sweeping, vacuuming and washing all floors should be done regularly as per traffic and use. At a minimum, this should be done every week for low-traffic offices and as often as once daily in high-traffic areas.

Note 1: Special attention should be paid to cleaning high traffic spaces more often (adapt the schedule as per the work place).

Note 2: Regular cleaning of all surfaces in public spaces should be done often. It is recommended to do it as frequently as every 2 hours or even more frequently if there is an increased risk of contamination by many people. Please adapt the cleaning schedule as relevant per workplace traffic and use.

Procedure for routine cleaning requirements for government vehicles (including cars, vans, tractors, forklifts, etc.) and CCG vessels, helicopters and small crafts
Step Procedure
1.

Focus on disinfecting vehicle hot spots: keys or key fobs, starter button on some vehicles, inside and outside door handles, inside door grab handles, pads and armrests, steering wheel, shift lever and console, rearview mirror, dashboard, power window and power door lock switches, radio and climate control buttons, turn signal and wiper stalks, seat adjuster, touch screen, and any other parts that are commonly used and that may have been touched (for example, glove compartment, hood, trunk, van panel door handles, and pick-up tailgate handle).

2.

If the vehicle has a touch screen, don’t use cleaning products that contain ammonia, since it can strip off anti-glare and anti-fingerprint coatings on the screen.

3.

The surfaces inside most vehicles are usually more delicate, so staff is to take care in how they apply cleaning products. They should wipe down leather gently with a microfiber cloth, as rubbing too vigorously could damage the leather.

4.

When wiping down fabric upholstery, staff should avoid using too much water, as this could create a musty smell or encourage mould to grow in the cushions.

Procedure for cleaning/disinfecting
Step Procedure
1.
  1. It is important to make the distinction between cleaning and disinfecting. Definitions to consider:
    1. 1.1. Cleaning: the removal of germs, dirt, debris and impurities from surfaces, usually using water and soap/detergent. Cleaning does not necessarily kill germs, but by removing them, it lowers their numbers and the risk of spreading infection.
    2. 1.2. Disinfection: the inactivation of disease producing organisms, usually using a bactericidal or virucidal solution. In the case of COVID-19, a virucidal solution is required.
    3. 1.3. Low-level disinfection: when processing non-critical environmental surfaces.
      1. Examples: toys, dishes, utensils, food packaging, personal electronics such as cell phones, keyboards, laptops
    4. 1.4. Intermediate-level disinfection: when processing personal instruments, non-critical medical supplies, and environmental surfaces.
      1. Examples: counters, floors, doorknobs, handrails, chair handles, light buttons, shared telephones, keyboards or other supplies that are used by many people, elevator buttons, medical supplies for regular non COVID-19 related patient activities (such as stethoscopes, blood pressure machines, examination table)
    5. 1.5. High-level disinfection: when processing surfaces contaminated with body fluids (for example, vomitus, diarrhea, mucus, feces), and when processing surfaces that have been in contact with a suspected/symptomatic case of COVID-19 (such as individual's cabin or desk, healthcare settings like a walk-in clinic, sick bay or dispensary where the patient received care)
  2. If they can withstand the use of liquids for disinfection, high-touch electronic devices (for example, cell phone screens, tablets, smartboards) may be disinfected with 70% alcohol (for example, alcohol prep wipes) at least daily by the person using them. It is also recommended to consult the manufacturer's instructions to see whether they recommend a specific disinfecting product for their devices.
2.

Products to use for cleaning

  1. Staff can choose relevant products that clean and disinfect all at once as per the level of contamination (for example, solution prepared with water and bleach, premixed store-bought disinfectant cleaning solutions and/or wipes when available).
  2. Although the use of household bleach and water solution is a very effective method to fight viruses and can be used for COVID-19, one of the many Health Canada approved products can also be used.
  3. For each different product used:
    1. 3.1. Always follow the manufacturer's instructions for the use of these products.
    2. 3.2. Do not mix different products, as they can generate very irritating and toxic fumes.
    3. 3.3. Ensure that the product has sufficient contact time with the surface to be disinfected. This contact time is usually specified by the product manufacturer.
    4. 3.4. Consult the manufacturer’s instructions and/or safety data sheets (SDS) to verify the appropriate PPE required for all cleaning and disinfecting products used.
Procedure for preparing bleach solutions for efficient disinfection
Step Procedure
1.
  1. If staff choose to use a water and bleach solution, they should choose the solution’s concentration as per the level of contamination explained in step 1 of the table above (procedure for cleaning/disinfecting).
  2. Take note that when in doubt, the 1:9 concentration ratio solution can be used at all times.
2.
  1. For low to intermediate disinfection grade, use a 1:50 solution.
    1. 1.1. Use the following instructions to prepare a 1:50 solution:
      1. dilute 1 part bleach to 50 parts water for a 1:50 ratio
        (0.105% NaChl, 1000 ppm AvChl)
        1. For example, mix 20 mL of household bleach with 1000 mL of water.
  2. For high disinfection grade, use a 1:9 solution.
    1. 2.1. Use the following instructions to prepare a 1:9 solution
      1. dilute 1 part bleach to 9 parts water for a 1:9 ratio
        (0.525% NaChl, 5000 ppm AvChl)
        1. For example, mix 250 mL of household bleach with 2250 mL of water.

Note: Basic bleach is usually: 5.25% NaChl 50,000 ppm AvChl.

3.
  1. Notes about bleach
    1. 1.1. Always use proper PPE when preparing and using a bleach solution.
    2. 1.2. In order for the disinfectant solution to maintain an optimal potency, a new solution must be made daily.
    3. 1.3. Care must be taken not to damage the surfaces that need to be disinfected.
Procedure for low to intermediate-level cleaning/disinfecting with a 1:50 solution
Step Procedure
1.
  1. A clean-up kit for low to intermediate-level cleaning/disinfecting should have the following materials pre-assembled:
    1. 1.1. garbage bags and duct tape
    2. 1.2. heavy-duty gloves
    3. 1.3. procedural or surgical mask if the smell of bleach is irritating
    4. 1.4. long sleeved protective gown to protect clothes, or plan a change of clothes after the cleaning procedure
      Note: Bleach can damage all types of clothing.
    5. 1.5. eye protection (if risk of splashing from chemicals is anticipated)
    6. 1.6. regular closed work shoes
    7. 1.7. paper towels or cloths
    8. 1.8. 1:50 bleach solution prepared daily as described in step 2 of the table above (procedure for preparing bleach solutions for efficient disinfection)
    9. 1.9. water
    10. 1.10. signs, barrier tape (optional)
2.
  1. In low to intermediate-level cleaning/disinfection areas, PPE is mainly intended to protect personnel from potential exposure to the cleaning/disinfecting products.
  2. Always consult the manufacturer’s instructions and/or SDS to verify the appropriate PPE required for all cleaning and disinfecting products used.
  3. At a minimum, put on the following PPE from the clean-up kit:
    1. 3.1. heavy-duty gloves
    2. 3.2. long sleeved protective gown to protect clothes, or plan a change of clothes after the cleaning procedure
      Note: Bleach can damage all types of clothing.
    3. 3.3. eye protection (if risk of splashing from the chemical solution is anticipated)
  4. Frequently replace the cloths used for cleaning and disinfecting, especially when you move from one place to another.
  5. When using a bleach solution, to ensure proper disinfection, the surface must be thoroughly wiped down with a cloth that is soaked (nearly dripping) with the solution and left to air dry completely. Do not rinse or dry the solution off the surface; doing so will prevent the surface from being fully disinfected. Rinsing of surfaces should occur only when the disinfecting solution has dried completely.
  6. For all other products approved by Health Canada, please refer to the manufacturer guidance for proper use.
  7. Put all soiled disposable cleaning materials and soiled PPE into the garbage bag. Contaminated disposable PPE is placed in another bag (double bagged).
  8. After cleaning, when the gloves are removed, wash hands and forearms with soap and water.
  9. Rags that are washable should be washed thoroughly with hot water and detergent and then dried, or discarded and replaced with new ones if necessary.
  10. Clean and disinfect all reusable PPE in accordance with cleaning protocols.
  11. Remove clothing and/or outerwear protection and wash them in hot water in a washing machine with regular detergent, or dispose of them once the cleaning has been completed.
  12. Wash clothes in hot water in a washing machine with regular detergent.
  13. Shower as soon as possible when cleaning is completed.
  14. The final disposal of all materials must be in accordance with Fleet Safety Manual (FSM) - 7.E.6 Handling and Discharge – Solid WasteFootnote *.
Procedure for high-level cleaning/disinfecting with a 1:9 solution
Step Procedure
1.
  1. Any workspaces used or occupied by a symptomatic employee must be effectively cleaned and disinfected as high-level disinfection.
  2. At present time, the scientific community cannot determine the exact duration of survival of the virus in the air. However, considering the current recommendations based on the fact that the clinical diagnosis of employees would often be unknown if they become symptomatic, it is recommended to close, as much as possible, the areas used by sick people and wait at least 3 hours before starting cleaning and disinfection. If possible, open the exterior windows to increase air circulation in the affected area. This waiting period will also allow reaching a certain level of virus inactivation on surfaces.
  3. A clean-up kit for the disinfection of COVID-19 related spaces should have the following materials pre-assembled:
    1. 3.1. garbage bags and duct tape
    2. 3.2. heavy-duty gloves
    3. 3.3. procedural or surgical mask
    4. 3.4. long sleeved protective gown or disposable coverall (for example, Tyvek)
      Note: Bleach can damage all types of clothing.
    5. 3.5. eye protection (safety googles or face shield)
    6. 3.6. boots or closed work shoes
    7. 3.7. paper towels
    8. 3.8. cloths
    9. 3.9. 1:9 bleach solution prepared daily as described in step 2 of the table above (procedure for preparing bleach solutions for efficient disinfection)
    10. 3.10. water
    11. 3.11. signs, barrier tape (optional)
2.
  1. PPE should protect personnel from potential exposure to COVID-19 as well as the cleaning/disinfecting products. Always consult manufacturer’s instructions and/or SDS to verify the appropriate PPE required for all cleaning and disinfecting products used.
  2. At a minimum, put on the following PPE from the clean-up kit:
    1. 2.1. heavy-duty gloves
    2. 2.2. long sleeved protective gown or disposable coverall when any risk of splashing (for example, Tyvek)
    3. 2.3. procedural or surgical mask
    4. 2.4. eye protection (if risk of splash from organic material or chemicals is anticipated)
      Note: When there is a risk of getting wet during operations and waterproof protection is required, the disposable coverall (for example, Tyvek) is the best choice.
  3. Frequently replace the cloths used for cleaning and disinfecting, especially when you move from one surface to another in the same room.
  4. When using bleach solution, to ensure proper disinfection, the surface must be thoroughly wiped down with a cloth that is soaked (nearly dripping) with the solution and left to air dry completely. Do not rinse or dry the solution off the surface; doing so will prevent the surface from being fully disinfected. Rinsing of surfaces should occur only when the disinfecting solution has dried completely.
  5. Put all soiled disposable cleaning materials and soiled PPE into the garbage bag. Contaminated disposable PPE is placed in another bag (double bagged).
  6. After cleaning, when the gloves are removed, wash hands and forearms with soap and water.
  7. Cloths that are washable should be washed thoroughly with hot water and detergent and then dried, or discarded and replaced with new ones if necessary.
  8. Clean and disinfect all reusable PPE in accordance with cleaning protocols.
  9. Remove clothing and/or outerwear protection and wash in hot water in a washing machine with regular detergent them or dispose of them once the cleaning has been completed.
  10. Wash clothes in hot water in a washing machine with regular detergent.
  11. Shower as soon as possible when cleaning is completed.
  12. The final disposal of all materials must be in accordance with FSM - 7.E.6 Handling and Discharge – Solid WasteFootnote *
Procedure for cleaning and washing carpets and curtains
Step Procedure
1.

Relevant to cleaning porous surfaces, such as carpets and curtains: remove any visible contamination when present, and clean with the appropriate cleaning products indicated for use on these surfaces. After cleaning, if items can be washed, wash them according to the manufacturer's instructions, using, if possible, the warmest water setting appropriate for these items, then dry completely afterwards.

2.
  1. Curtains (doors and windows)
    1. 1.1. When possible remove curtains or leave the blinds up.
    2. 1.2. On vessels: Curtains hanging at the cabin’s door could be seen as a contamination risk because it can be touched and manipulated with bare and uncleaned hands by anybody on the vessel. Therefore, those curtains should not be used during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    3. 1.3. Curtains hanging at windows are deemed low risk if they are manipulated and touched only by the person living in the room/cabin.
  2. Sheets, mattresses and pillows
    1. 2.1. Recommendations:
      1. Use sheets at all time on top of mattresses and pillow cases. When dirty, wash them in hot water with detergent.
      2. Use mattress covers that can be cleaned in a washing machine with hot water and detergent between crews/users.
      3. Use pillow covers that can be cleaned in washing machines with hot water and detergent between crews/users or provide individual pillows to every crew members that would be used by only 1 person.

Note: Very little reliable information is currently available on how to care for textile products like mattresses and pillows during the COVID-19 pandemic. However it is possible to make a risk analysis with the information found on relevant sources.

Procedure for cleaning and disinfection in healthcare settings (dispensaries, clinics, designated area for caring of a sick person)
Step Procedure
1.
  1. What to do between each patient seen in the healthcare facilities, for any reasons not related to COVID-19 symptoms (cold zone):
    1. 1.1. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces with detergent and disinfectant wipe/solution between each episode of patient care (according to normal infection prevention and control practice).
    2. 1.2. Take care to clean/disinfect surfaces in areas that patients have directly been in contact with or that have been exposed to respiratory droplets.
    3. 1.3. Clean and disinfect equipment after each use (blood pressure machine, examination table, any other examination tools that are not single use and disposable).
    4. 1.4. Floors should be cleaned at least once a day, using a detergent solution.
  2. Unless in distress and in need of immediate care, crew members and supernumeraries should be advised to remain in their cabin if they become sick with COVID-19 related symptoms. That will avoid cross contamination around the ship and in the healthcare facilities that would then become a hot zone until deep cleaned. They can be properly assessed in their cabin using physical distancing as much as possible. When clinical examination is needed, it can be done using proper PPE.
2.
  1. What to do if someone becomes sick/symptomatic for COVID-19 (hot zones):
    1. 1.1. Identify all spaces that could have been contaminated by this individual (such as cabin, work place, dispensary, clinic).
      Note: As soon as a person becomes symptomatic, they should isolate in their cabin or a space previously identified. If they have to circulate in the vessel, they must wear a procedural or chirurgical mask on their face to avoid cross contamination of surfaces and people when respecting physical distancing is impossible.
    2. 1.2. After the person has left the space, if possible, aerate the room and wait 3 hours before starting the cleaning procedures.
    3. 1.3. In that situation, enhanced cleaning should be done with the bleach solution that has a concentration ratio of 1:9. See table above (procedure for high-level cleaning/disinfecting with a 1:9 solution).
    4. 1.4. Wear proper PPE, and refer to the above procedure for high-level cleaning/disinfecting with a 1:9 solution.
    5. 1.5. Clean, dust and disinfect all surfaces, furniture, windows frames, all surfaces of bed and mattress, desk, counters, etc.
    6. 1.6. Remove sheets, mattresses’ cover, pillow covers and curtains, and put them in a sealable garbage bag to safely bring them to laundry area.
    7. 1.7. Mop floor.
    8. 1.8. After the cleanup is finished, bring the bag of linen and curtains to washing machine area while wearing proper PPE (gloves, and procedural or surgical mask) for handling the bag.
      Note: The garbage bag can also be wiped with the disinfectant solution to minimize cross contamination on the way to laundry area.
    9. 1.9. Wash the linen and curtains in the warmest water possible as per manufacturer's instructions, with regular detergent.
    10. 1.10. Dry in machine.

It is normal to be concerned about the COVID-19 outbreak, especially if you or those you know are directly affected by the situation. If you have any concerns or would like to speak with Employee Assistance Program (EAP), call 1-800-268-7708 and/or speak directly with your manager.

Enquiries

Enquiries regarding this procedure should be directed to:

Date modified: