ARCHIVED - Canadian Coast Guard Business Plan 2010-2013

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Section 3: What We Are Focusing On

Having made significant progress in recent years on a range of management and administrative issues, CCG is now able to turn its attention to priority initiatives that go to the heart of Coast Guard's ability to serve Canadians effectively. For the 2010-2013 Business Plan, CCG has simplified and reframed its priority action areas, focussing on significant matters that concern three critical success factors for the Coast Guard - Our People, Our Assets and Our Future.

In addition to the priorities discussed in this section, CCG manages a wide variety of day-to-day operations and activities, details of which can be found in Section 5.

Priority 1: Our People

  • A Qualified and Representative Workforce
  • Develop and Support People
  • Fair and Effective Management

Priority 2: Our Assets

  • Updating the Coast Guard's Long-term Fleet Renewal Plan
  • Procurement of New and Replacement Vessels
  • Economic Action Plan
  • Long-term Planning for Shore-based Infrastructure
  • Upgrade Vessel Traffic Information Systems

Priority 3: Our Future

  • e-Navigation
  • Strengthening Our Ability to Meet Obligations in the Arctic
  • Environmental Management Framework
  • Strategic Review
  • Research and Development Strategy

Priority 1: Our People

2009-2010 Accomplishments

  • Increased representation within the four employment equity groups by 6.4% from the previous year. For the first time in the past five years, 30% of the CCG workforce has self-identified as belonging to one of the four designated employment equity groups.

  • Advertised CCG jobs under our own banner for external and internal employment opportunities.

  • Finalized a Framework for Continuous Learning and Development.

  • The Standard Organization was launched in May 2009 and the three-year transition has begun.

  • Public Service Employee Survey results were assessed and communicated to employees and unions.

  • An Essential Services Agreement for Ships' Crew was concluded with the Public Service Alliance of Canada which designates all Ships' Crew on duty on CCG vessels as providing essential services.

The strength of the Coast Guard is its dedicated and professional employees. Our people are what shape CCG into the organization it is today. In fact, investments in our workforce will continue and, over the next three years, CCG will focus on fostering a qualified and representative workforce, developing and supporting people, and demonstrating fair and effective management.

We are facing new challenges with the release of Budget 2010, but we remain committed to providing Canadians with high-level services. Priority 1 of this Business Plan provides an overview of our approach; further operational details can be found throughout this publication and in our Strategic Human Resources Plan.

A Qualified and Representative Workforce

Demographic shifts continue to be the biggest single influence on our workforce as increasing numbers of experienced CCG employees become eligible for retirement and the Canadian population continues to become more diversified.

Table 1 - Distribution by Occupational Group

Occupational Group

2009

Ships’ Crew (SC)

1368

Ships’ Officer (SO)

906

Marine Communication and Traffic Services Officers (RO)

362

Electronics Technologists (EL)

255

Engineering and Land Survey (EN)

79

Engineering Technologist (EG)

46

Clerical and Regulatory (CR)

231

General Technical (GT)

344

General Labour and Trades (GL)

277

Administrative Services (AS)

265

Executive (EX)

54

Lightkeepers (LI)

114

Student

18

Other

146

Total

4465

The five at-risk groups essential to operations (Ships' Officers, Ships' Crew, Radio Operators, Engineers, and Electronics Technologists) will continue to be of primary concern. Recruitment measures specific to each group are being implemented. Such measures include increasing the enrolment of officer-cadets at the Canadian Coast Guard College; creating a second national pool of Marine Communication and Traffic Services (MCTS) Officers; hiring more Electronics Technologists through the Marine Electronics Development Program, which allows participants to gain the knowledge and skills they need for working-level positions within CCG; creating an Engineering Workforce Solutions Action Plan, which includes an Engineering Professional Development Program; and implementing a Ships' Crew Certification Program beginning with the module for the 3rd Class Engineer certificate. Each of these measures is explained further in Section 5 of the 2010-2013 Business Plan and in the 2010-2013 Strategic Human Resources Plan.

CCG recognizes that recruitment is an opportunity to create a workforce that is representative of the Canadian population. The 2008-2011 Department of Fisheries and Oceans Employment Equity Management Action Plan (DFO EE MAP) is our guide to achieving a representative workforce; it identifies employment equity gaps, potential barriers to reducing gaps, and actions to take to address these barriers. The EE MAP Report Card, which was established and implemented within CCG in 2009, tracks the progress made toward reducing these barriers. We have eliminated barriers for employment equity (EE) candidates vying for seagoing positions, including removal of the second-language prerequisite for Officer Training Program candidates. We portray designated group members at sea in our promotional materials and offer a six-month dispensation for all determinate employees to attain Marine Emergency Duty certification, thus encouraging them to pursue careers at sea. We have also created the Operational Women's Network to provide a forum for communication among seagoing women. For the first time in the past five years, 30% of our workforce has self-identified as being a member of one of the four designated EE groups. As demonstrated in Figure 2, overall representation has increased consistently for all four employment equity groups in the past five years; CCG will continue to work on improving the representation of all groups, with a particular focus on persons with disabilities and visible minorities.

Figure 2
Overall Employment Equity Representation vs. Availability (2004 - 2009)
Overall Employment Equity Representation vs. Availability (2004 - 2009)

In an effort to increase our representation, we will continue to refine our recruitment tools to reflect our specific needs. For example, in 2009, CCG was granted authority to advertise both external and internal employment opportunities under its own banner, rather than under the DFO banner. This will both increase CCG's visibility within the public service and help those outside government find CCG job postings. By becoming more visible to those outside CCG, we are able to reach a larger pool of candidates who are members of EE groups and who could therefore help to improve our overall representation.

The Careers page of the CCG website has been enhanced to profile the five at-risk groups. CCG information kits for recruitment, which illustrate the wide range of exciting job opportunities at the Agency, are being finalized and will be distributed in each region. These kits will also provide tips on navigating the application process and will be used at career fairs and other outreach events. This year, we will continue our participation in the Partners for Workplace Inclusion Program in Vancouver, British Columbia, and in St. John's, Newfoundland.

In 2010-2011, we will continue to enhance our capacity to ensure that qualified recruits and employees who belong to an EE group fill vacancies within our organization. Since 2005, our overall EE representation has increased by an average of five percent per year. In 2010-2011, CCG will aim to achieve a seven percent increase of its overall EE representation by continuing to hire from EE groups and by promoting self-identification to all employees.

Commitment

In response to...

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Develop outreach material targeting persons with disabilities to allow them to envisage work at sea.

2008-2011 DFO EE MAP

DG, Integrated Business Management Services (IBMS)

Distribute outreach material at regional career and outreach events, targeting secondary and College students, emphasizing the Agency’s need for a diverse workforce.

2008-2011 DFO EE MAP

Executive Director (ED), National Labour Force Renewal Directorate (NLFRD)

Continue to participate in the Partners for Workplace Inclusion Program in Vancouver, British Columbia, and in St. John’s, Newfoundland.

2008-2011 DFO EE MAP

AC, Pacific
AC, NL

Increase overall employment equity representation by 7%.

2008-2011 DFO EE MAP

CCG Management Board Members

Develop and Support People

Investments in people are essential if CCG is to deliver programs and services of the highest standard. Since the launch of the Performance Review System (PRS) in 2008-2009, CCG has continued its efforts to monitor and promote regular performance reviews and the development of learning plans. Individual Learning Plans present an excellent opportunity for CCG managers and employees to have a discussion centred on organizational objectives, career management, and learning needs as they link to the performance objectives.

Training takes place throughout the organization, with core national educational programs provided by the Canadian Coast Guard College. CCG offers training programs that allow both new and existing employees to advance within the ranks. In 2010-2011, the Canadian Coast Guard will refine its Orientation Program to help new employees integrate more quickly into the organization. Furthermore, along with the Engineering Community Workforce Solutions Action Plan and the Ships' Crew Certification Program, Fleet management encourages seagoing personnel to gain management experience through rotational shore-based assignments. The national Leadership Development Pilot Program has helped participants develop leadership skills and gain a broader knowledge of the organization, and in 2010-2011 we will evaluate this pilot program to determine next steps. CCG will also put in place a refresher course for existing MCTS Officers.

In an effort to provide employees with opportunities to gain valuable experience and corporate knowledge, CCG uses a variety of tools such as short-term acting appointments. These tools help prepare employees to participate in competitions for advancement and will ultimately aid in the succession planning of CCG's workforce.

In 2009-2010, Coast Guard established dedicated budgets for training and development in each region and for each function at national Headquarters. This year, CCG will implement a nationally consistent automated system to capture training needs identification, data collection and reporting. CCG will also review training standards and performance measures through benchmarking with similar organizations. In addition, CCG will continue to encourage the use of cost-neutral training activities such as job shadowing, job exchange, mentoring and on-line courses.

Improving our capacity in both official languages continues to be a priority. Although the second-language prerequisite no longer applies to candidates enrolling in the Officer Training Program at the CCG College, we will reinforce our existing second-language training capacity at the College to ensure that graduating officer-cadets meet official language requirements. Fair, transparent and equitable management of language training must be balanced against CCG's operational and financial constraints. In 2010-2011, we will implement a structured approach to dealing with requests for developmental language training. In 2009, the highest percentage of employees in CCG history met the linguistic profile of their positions (96%), demonstrating that the Agency's efforts to recruit bilingual candidates and provide language training are yielding positive results.

Commitment

In response to...

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Launch a more structured CCG Orientation Program for all new employees.

PSES

ED, NLFRD

Evaluate the national Leadership Development Pilot Program and determine next steps.

PSES

AC, NL

Implement a nationally consistent automated system to capture training needs identification, data collection and reporting.

PSES

ED, NLFRD

Implement a structured approach to dealing with requests for developmental language training. 

 

PSES

ED, NLFRD;

CCG Management Board Members

Fair and Effective Management

CCG will continue to focus on fair and effective management practices. Staffing practices will continue to improve by relying more heavily on collective staffing and pools of qualified candidates and by reducing the use of temporary employment measures.

In response to the 2005 Public Service Employee Survey (PSES), the 2006 A-Base Review and the 2007 Report of the Auditor General, CCG developed a model for a Standard Organization (SO). The SO is essential to ensuring that CCG manages its business both fairly and effectively. The launch of the SO in May 2009 was a significant step for CCG, as it will enable more consistent service delivery, resolve classification anomalies, and ensure the appropriate distribution of resources across the Agency. Implementation of the SO is targeted for completion by spring 2012. CCG will continue to develop tools as required, monitor implementation, and measure and communicate progress with its employees and their unions.

In 2009-2010, Coast Guard assessed the results of the 2008 PSES and communicated its findings to employees and unions. Three areas of strength and three areas for improvement were identified. The areas of strength are job satisfaction, having the right talent in the right place at the right time, and positive working relationships and effective communication. The three areas that need improvement are executive leadership, effective and value-based staffing, and career opportunities and development.

Through consultations with employees, managers, and unions, CCG has forged a collaborative way forward with a focus on increasing employee engagement.

In the coming years, Coast Guard will examine creative ways to increase PSES response rates among its seagoing personnel, thus helping us continue to achieve excellence in our workplace and in our service to Canadians.

CCG will continue to promote the Performance Review System by monitoring completion rates for shore-based and seagoing personnel. This will ensure ongoing dialogue between managers and employees concerning organizational and individual objectives.

Commitment

In response to...

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Continue transition to Standard Organization.

 

OAG

A-Base Review

PSES

CCG Management Board Members

Commissioner's Commendation Awarded to Mark Chin-Yee, Wade Stagg, Shauna Akerman, and Terri-Lynn Broomfield

Mark Chin-Yee, the Regional Director for Integrated Technical Services in Maritimes Region, uses his influence to make CCG's workforce more diverse and accepting. He works with Maritimes's Regional Diversity Advisory Committee and has taken this role much further by ensuring the establishment of networks for women and persons with disabilities.

Wade Stagg, Shauna Akerman, and Terri-Lynn Broomfield have worked diligently to increase the representation of women and Aboriginals in the fleet and to promote seagoing careers in the Newfoundland Region. The Marine Superintendent's Group has been awarded the commendation for using innovative approaches in HR management to ensure that the fleet has a representative workforce with the skills and experience needed now and in the future.

Left to right: Nancy Hurlburt (AC, Maritimes), Mark Chin-Yee.
Left to right: Nancy Hurlburt (AC, Maritimes), Mark Chin-Yee.

Left to right: John Butler (AC, NL), Shauna Akerman, Wade Stagg, Terri-Lynn Broomfield.
Left to right: John Butler (AC, NL), Shauna Akerman, Wade Stagg, Terri-Lynn Broomfield.

Priority 2: Our Assets

2009-2010 Accomplishments

Procurement of New and Replacement Vessels
  • Delivered the CCGS Kelso, a Specialty Vessel, as part of Fleet Renewal.
  • Awarded the construction contract for 9 Mid-shore Patrol Vessels (MSPV).
Economic Action Plan
  • Awarded a contract to construct five 47-foot Search and Rescue (SAR) Lifeboats.
  • Awarded contracts for vessel life extensions for the CCGS Limnos, CCGS Tracy, and the CCGS Barlett.
  • Awarded contracts for three Near-shore Fishery Science Vessels.
  • Awarded contracts for the purchase of 51 small craft of the 60 small craft to be acquired, of which 15 have been delivered.
Upgrade Vessel Traffic Information Systems
  • Successfully upgraded the Vessel Traffic Management Information Systems/Information System on Marine Navigation (VTMIS/INNAV) in MCTS Centres and installed an INNAV technical training platform at the CCG College.

As an operational agency, the Coast Guard relies heavily upon its fleet and shore-side assets to deliver maritime programs and services critical to Canadians.

CCG manages a substantial base of physical and technical assets with a replacement value of well over $11 billion. These assets include a fleet of small, medium, and large vessels and helicopters, land- and water-based assets other than vessels such as navigation aids and communication towers, a fleet of land-based vehicles, cranes and forklifts, program-specific information systems, and assets and facilities used in support of CCG's training needs at the Coast Guard College.

Although these assets are critical to the delivery of our programs and services, they are generally old, having an historic cost of a little over $2 billion. The ages of many of our fleet and shore-based assets now exceed their original design lives. Maintaining and replacing these assets is therefore vital to ensuring that CCG is able to meet current and anticipated future service demands.

The activities and initiatives outlined below are part of an integrated investment planning process designed to renew and improve the condition of Coast Guard's capital assets, This process will have direct and positive effects on the quality and extent of CCG service delivery and on our ability to control the related operational and maintenance costs.

 

Updating the Coast Guard's Long-term Fleet Renewal Plan

The Fleet Renewal Plan (FRP) addresses the need to renew the CCG fleet of vessels and helicopters over 30 years so that CCG can continue to meet the current and future on-water requirements of the Government of Canada. The Plan envisions a national civilian fleet of vessels and helicopters built along a class structure, capable of multi-tasking, more efficient to operate and maintain, and better able to respond to changing priorities, environmental conditions and program requirements.

Revisions to the Fleet Renewal Plan were substantially completed in 2009-2010, in accordance with the commitment our 2009-2012 CCG Business Plan. However, emerging government priorities have prompted Coast Guard to carry this commitment over to 2010-2011, in line with government direction.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Continue to develop the Fleet Renewal Plan in line with government direction.

DG, Fleet

Procurement of New and Replacement Vessels

To ensure the successful delivery of vessels in support of Fleet Renewal, CCG has put in place an organization and processes dedicated to delivering complex procurement projects. Throughout the Fleet Renewal planning and procurement processes, CCG will seek strategic advice and independent expert counsel and will consult with central agencies to ensure adherence to Treasury Board policies and requirements. Internal controls and challenge functions targeting project scope, expenditure management and reporting will be enhanced through the existing Major Crown Projects (MCP) Directorate, a centre of excellence for the management of Fleet Renewal projects, and the newly created position of Deputy Commissioner, Procurement. This governance model aligns CCG with other departments and supports the government's commitment to the Canadian shipbuilding industry through a long-term approach to federal procurement.

CCG has been funded in recent budgets to acquire up to 14 new large vessels at a cost of $1.4 billion:

  • 9 Mid-shore Patrol Vessels (MSPV);
  • 3 Offshore Fishery Science Vessels (OFSV);
  • 1 Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel (OOSV); and
  • 1 Polar Icebreaker.

In September 2009, a contract was awarded to Irving Shipbuilding for the construction of nine MSPV.

Budget 2010 has also provided further funding of $27.3 million for the procurement of 1 Air Cushion Vehicle.

Mid-shore Patrol Vessels

Five of the nine Mid-shore Patrol Vessels will be used primarily to support the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Conservation and Protection program in the Maritimes, Quebec, and Pacific Regions. The other four vessels will be used in a joint program with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to enhance maritime security along the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Seaway system. Detailed construction verification is nearing completion and fabrication of the first of the nine Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels is scheduled to begin in the first half of 2010-2011. All nine vessels will be delivered by 2013.

Commitment

In response to…

Lead

2010-11

 

 

Begin construction of the first of nine Mid-shore Patrol Vessels.

AG
A-Base

DG, MCP

2011-2012

 

 

Deliver the first three Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels.

AG
A-Base

DG, MCP

2012-13

 

 

Deliver the remaining six Mid-shore Patrol Vessels.

AG
A-Base

DG, MCP

Offshore Fishery Science Vessels

The three OFSV will replace aging Coast Guard ships on the east and west coasts of Canada. They will provide a platform from which critical scientific research and ecosystem-based management can be performed. The OFSV project is currently in the definition phase, and all vessels are expected to be delivered by 2015.

During 2009-2010, the concept design work was finalized, and the Work Scope Definition and the associated Design Instructions and Guidance were developed.   A contract will be issued for the development of the detailed design and construction specifications package during 2010-2011.

Commitment

In response to…

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Issue a competitive Request for Proposal, and award a contract to design three Offshore Fishery Science Vessels.

AG

A-Base

DG, MCP

2011- 2012

 

 

Develop the Effective Project Approval package for submission to Treasury Board.

 

DG, MCP

Award the contract to build the Offshore Fishery Science Vessels.

 

DG, MCP

2012-2013

 

 

Manage the construction of the Offshore Fishery Science Vessels.

 

DG, MCP

Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel

The Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel (OOSV) project will acquire a replacement vessel for the Canadian Coast Guard’s largest science vessel: CCGS Hudson, built in 1963. Its replacement is critical to fulfilling the Department’s science mandate, as well as those of other government departments and agencies.  The OOSV project is currently in the definition phase and delivery of the vessel is planned for 2013.  During 2009-2010, the concept design work was finalized and the Work Scope Definition and the associated Design Instructions and Guidance were developed. A contract will be issued for the development of the detailed design and construction specifications during 2010-2011.

Commitment

In response to…

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Issue a competitive Request for Proposal, and award a contract to design an Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel.

AG

A-Base

DG, MCP

2011-2012

 

 

Develop the Effective Project Approval package for submission to Treasury Board.

 

DG, MCP

Award the contract to build the Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel.

AG

A-Base

DG, MCP

2012-2013

 

 

Manage the construction of the Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel.

AG

A-Base

DG, MCP

Polar Icebreaker

A new Polar Icebreaker, CCGS John G. Diefenbaker, will be designed and built to enter into service in 2017. The new Polar Icebreaker will replace the Coast Guard’s largest and most capable heavy icebreaker, CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent, which is nearing the end of its useful life and is scheduled for decommissioning in 2017.

In 2009-2010, following Preliminary Project Approval by Treasury Board, the Polar Icebreaker project activities included completion of the mission profile, stakeholder consultations and validation of operational requirements. Currently planned for 2010-2011 is the development of a conceptual design, to be followed by the detailed design work.

Commitment

In response to…

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Develop the Operational Requirements and the Conceptual Design for the new Polar Icebreaker.

AG

A-Base

DG, MCP

2011-2012

 

 

Award the contract for the design of the Polar Icebreaker. 

AG

A-Base

DG, MCP

2012-2013

 

 

Conduct the Final Design Review.

 

DG, MCP

Air Cushion Vehicle

The recently announced new Air Cushion Vehicle (ACV) will replace CCGS Penac at the Canadian Coast Guard Sea Island Hovercraft Base in Richmond, British Columbia. It will provide for ongoing search and rescue coverage in the area, allowing CCG to continue fulfilling its mandate and maintain current levels of service. A contract for the construction of the ACV will be awarded in 2010-2011, with delivery expected in late 2012.

Commitment

In response to…

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Award the contract for construction of ACV.

AG

A-Base

DG, MCP

2011-2012

 

 

Manage construction of the ACV.

AG

A-Base

DG, MCP

2012-2013

 

 

Accept delivery of the ACV.

AG

A-Base

DG, MCP

Economic Action Plan

In Budget 2009, the Government of Canada provided the Department of Fisheries and Oceans with $392 million in direct funding to build and repair departmental assets, of which $175 million is related to the acquisition and repair of vessels for the CCG fleet.  As one of the six programs within DFO to receive funding from the Economic Action Plan (EAP), CCG has responded by advancing vessel procurement projects and maintenance activities to enhance or sustain CCG’s capability to meet current and future on-water needs of the Government of Canada.  The projects under the EAP include the construction and commissioning of five 47-foot Search and Rescue (SAR) Lifeboats, vessel life extensions for a number of CCG vessels, the purchase of environmental barges and small crafts, as well as additional refit and maintenance activities on vessels. In addition to providing CCG with needed funding and improving asset condition, the work also creates or maintains jobs within the construction and shipbuilding communities. The work began in 2009 and will be completed by March 31, 2011.

In 2009-2010, the Government of Canada awarded a contract to the Victoria Shipyards Limited to construct five 47-foot SAR Lifeboats.  Contracts were also awarded to conduct vessel life extensions for CCGS Limnos ($7 million contract was awarded to Heddle Marine in Burlington, Ontario) and CCGS Tracy ($6.9 million contract to Verreault Navigation in Les Méchins, Québec).  As for the contract for the vessel life extension of the CCGS Bartlett, a Phase I contract of $1.3 million to conduct preliminary work was awarded to Allied Shipyards of North Vancouver, BC; and a contract for Phase II, the main vessel life extension work, in the amount of $15.5 million was also awarded to Allied Shipyards in October 2009. The vessel life extension for the CCGS Bartlett was completed in May 2010.

The contracts for vessel design of two 22-metre and one 25-metre Near-shore Fishery Science Vessels were awarded to Robert Allen Limited, Vancouver.  The construction work will be conducted in 2010-2011.   The design for the environmental response barges has been delivered by Robert Allen Limited and a construction contract for 30 barges is underway. The environmental response barges will be constructed and delivered during 2010-2011.  Contracts have been awarded for 51 of the 60 small craft to be acquired, of which 15 have been delivered. All EAP refit activities planned for 2009-2010 have been completed.  

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Approve and accept delivery of the five 47-foot SAR Lifeboats.

DG, MCP

Award the contract and complete vessel life extension for:

  • CCGS Cape Roger
  • CCGS Tanu

DG, ITS

Approve and accept delivery of two 22-metre Near-Shore Fishery Science Vessels and one 25-metre Near-shore Fishery Science Vessel.

DG, ITS

Plan and complete $19 million of additional refit activities (representing work on 35 vessels).

DG, ITS

Approve and accept delivery of 30 replacement environmental response barges.

DG, ITS

Purchase and accept the remaining small craft, for a total of 60. 

DG, ITS

Long-term Planning for Shore-based Infrastructure

The CCG manages $1.6 billion in shore-based assets in support of the Aids to Navigation and Marine Communication and Traffic Services programs. Although short- to medium-term planning for shore-based infrastructure is incorporated into the CCG Integrated Investment Plan, the value and importance of these assets also justify creation of a long-term plan.

The Long-term Plan for Shore-based Infrastructure will present a 15-year plan for the capital investments required to ensure the reliability and availability of CCG’s shore-based assets. The Long-term Plan will address concerns regarding CCG’s ability to provide information on the condition of aids to navigation assets and infrastructure and its capacity to plan and prioritize maintenance, replacement and divestiture activities, as identified in the DFO and CCG corporate risk profiles.

Asset Class Plans, and the related Asset Condition Reports, are under development for both Aids to Navigation and Marine Communication and Traffic Services. They provide recommendations for the life-cycle management of assets, based on the age and expected service life of the asset base, current asset condition and recommended maintenance practices. These Asset Class Plans and Asset Condition Reports will be the foundation for the Long-term Plan.

Commitment

 Lead

2010-2011

 

Deliver an Asset Condition Report (high level assessment of the asset base) for Aids to Navigation.

DG, ITS

Deliver an Asset Condition Report (high level assessment of the asset base) for MCTS.

DG, ITS

Deliver an Asset Class Plan for Aids to Navigation.

DG, ITS

Deliver an Asset Class Plan for MCTS.

DG, ITS

2011-12

 

Publish the Long-term Plan for Shore-based Infrastructure.

DG, ITS

DG, MS

Upgrade Vessel Traffic Information Systems

Coast Guard (CG) currently operates two separate systems in Canada for vessel traffic management however CG is moving towards a single national vessel traffic management information system (VTMIS). The two systems are the Vessel Traffic Operator Support System (VTOSS), used on the West Coast, and the Information System on Marine Navigation (INNAV), used for the rest of Canada.  In 2009-2010, INNAV was upgraded to provide crucial functionality and interface with the Automatic Identification System (AIS).  The upgraded INNAV was deployed in April 2009 to all MCTS Centres in Eastern Canada.  This INNAV operational system was then further upgraded in March 2010 to incorporate those operating functionality that are required to enable effective management of vessel traffic on the West Coast. Deploying the most recent upgrade of INNAV and installing the required new equipment in the MCTS Centres in the Pacific Region will enable the decommissioning of VTOSS in 2010-2011.  This will give CCG the same operational system for vessel traffic management across Canada.  An INNAV technical training platform was also installed at the CCG College to allow for training of ITS technical support personnel.

  Commitment

  Lead

2010-2011

 

Complete operational training on the upgraded VTMIS-INNAV on the West Coast.

DG, ITS

DG, MS

AC, Pacific

Commission VTMIS-INNAV on the West Coast, decommission VTOSS, and dispose of old equipment.

DG, ITS

DG, MS

AC, Pacific

Commissioner's Commendations Awarded to William Conway and the Mamilossa Team

William Conway was recognized for the difficult task of being the Newfoundland and Labrador Region Integrated Technical Services lead for the deployment of the CCGS Terry Fox and the simultaneous project management of the CCGS Terry Fox and CCGS Henry Larsen refits. His efforts in planning both the technical and logistical support for the vessels from a marine engineering perspective resulted in a seamless transition. The two vessels were refitted on time and successfully met their Arctic commitments.

The Mamilossa project team, consisting of five team members, was responsible for representing Canadian Coast Guard's interests in the construction, testing and delivery of a AP1-88/400 type hovercraft (air cushion vehicle) to be deployed in the Quebec Region. The project team was required to travel to England to attend Technical and Production meetings and to monitor the construction of the craft over a 30 month build and delivery period.

Following successful trials in England, the craft was provisionally accepted in England on February 10, 2009; shipped to Canada; and accepted in Trois-Rivières on March 12, 2009. Thanks to the project team's efforts, the hovercraft was delivered on time and within budget.

Left to right: John Butler (AC, NL), William Conway.
Left to right: John Butler (AC, NL), William Conway.

Left to right: René Grenier (Deputy Commissioner, Operations), Frank Jess, Daniel L'Heureux, Charlene Whittaker for Wayne Cottle, Yves Marchand, Darlene Lefebvre, George Da Pont (Commissioner).
Left to right: René Grenier (Deputy Commissioner, Operations), Frank Jess, Daniel L'Heureux, Charlene Whittaker for Wayne Cottle, Yves Marchand, Darlene Lefebvre, George Da Pont (Commissioner).

Priority 3: Our Future

2009-2010 Accomplishments

e-Navigation
  • Conducted a comprehensive e-Navigation user needs survey.
Strengthening Our Ability to Meet Obligations in the Arctic
  • Began transmissions, on a test basis, of the navigational warning system for two Navigational Areas (NAVAREAs) in the Arctic.
  • Developed and validated operational requirements for the new Polar Icebreaker.
Environmental Management Framework
  • Completed a draft version of the Environmental Management Framework.
Research and Development Strategy
  • Drafted an innovation strategy for Research and Development.

Recent external developments related to the economy, national security, technology, and climate change are reshaping Coast Guard's business and operating environment. These factors, when combined with evolving government priorities and our Agency's own focus on improving service delivery, demand that we in Coast Guard think strategically with long-term goals in mind. This thinking is essential to providing the best advice possible on what our future direction is, and on what CCG will need to look like in the future. By virtue of our growing and diverse workforce, unique capital assets, the vast area we service, and those with whom we do business, Coast Guard works with communities, workers, and organizations across the country to build Canada's economic future.

Our crucial role in this context is to secure stable, renewed capabilities to deliver reliable and cost-effective maritime services within our means. These services must meet the current needs of Canadians and clients and be available for the challenges and opportunities that lie before us, such as those in the Arctic. By enabling the progress of others in the broader community, CCG can strengthen both Canada and its own role as a national institution. And while Coast Guard gives priority to meeting the service expectations of Canadians, it must also attend to its own renewal for the future through sustained focus on its work force and capital asset base.

Our Vision, Mission and Values statement is helping us to define our future directions, such as the development of an Arctic Vision to support the Government's Northern Strategy, an Environmental Management Framework to improve environmental outcomes related to our operations, and leadership across government on e-Navigation matters. A planned Strategic Review of activities and expenditures could provide CCG with an opportunity to better manage spending, modernize and simplify internal operations, and transform the way we do business to achieve better results for Canadians. We will also be taking a fresh look at our Research and Development Strategy and our funding options as part of our commitment to develop a CCG-wide culture of innovation.

e-Navigation

What is e-Navigation?

As defined by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), e-Navigation is:

The harmonised collection, integration, exchange and presentation of maritime information onboard and ashore by electronic means to enhance berth-to-berth navigation and related services, for safety and security at sea and protection of the marine environment.

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) expects e-Navigation to be implemented world-wide in the next 10 to 15 years. Through its implementation of several pilot projects such as MARINFO in the Quebec region and AVADEPTH in Pacific region, CCG is well positioned to take a leadership role in e-Navigation both domestically and internationally, to be at the forefront of its implementation, and to influence international standards.

Implementing e-Navigation in a coordinated and organized manner in Canada, that involves collaborating with multiple federal departments and the shipping industry, will significantly enhance safety, have positive economic effects and increase environmental protection.

In 2008-2009, CCG completed an internal strategic vision strategy for e-Navigation. The vision/strategy is based on our participation in the e-Navigation committee of the International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA), on the IMO e-Navigation implementation strategy, and on a national workshop involving key federal players. In 2009-2010, CCG conducted a comprehensive user needs survey, based on an international survey developed jointly by Canada and Germany, with input from the United States.  The survey was conducted nationally through face-to-face interviews and supported by an online version to maximize the number of participants. The results of this survey will be critical to determining national priorities and facilitating national and international implementation.

Keeping this momentum, for 2010-2011, CCG intends to broaden the participation of other key federal departments in e-Navigation − Transport Canada, Environment Canada and the Canadian Hydrographic Service, for example - and to work with them to develop a federal vision/strategy for e-Navigation as well as a high-level implementation plan. In parallel, CCG will initiate work to review its various information systems with a view to ensuring that future developments take into account e-Navigation requirements.

Commitment

In response to…

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Develop a federal vision/strategy and a high-level implementation plan for e-Navigation, in consultation with other government departments.

AG

DG, MS

Strengthening Our Ability to Meet Obligations in the Arctic

Retreating polar ice, global demand for resources, and prospects of year-round shipping are creating new challenges and opportunities for the North. DFO/CCG activities across all sectors play a key role in Northern commerce, safety, and security; sustainable resource development; our understanding and protection of Arctic ecosystems and habitats; and the facilitations of Northerners' quest for greater economic prosperity. The Canadian Coast Guard acts as a platform for many of these activities, as well as undertaking critical roles in the Arctic under its own mandate.

Our Arctic activities, many of which are delivered in partnership with others, include:

  • Escorting commercial ships through ice to ensure access to Northern communities;
  • Supporting scientific endeavours such as hydrographic charting and marine science;
  • Maintaining some aids to navigation in Canadian Arctic waterways;
  • Delivering primary response capability to respond to pollution incidents north of 60;
  • Providing maritime search and rescue services;
  • Providing a safety radio communication service from two seasonal Arctic Marine Communication and Traffic Services Centres: Inuvik in the west and Iqaluit in the east;
  • Broadcasting weather and ice information and navigational warnings;
  • Delivering food, cargo, and fuel to remote sites where commercial services are unavailable;
  • Conducting joint exercises with international partners and the Department of National Defence (Operation NANOOK, for example); and
  • Developing an improved awareness of the Arctic maritime domain through vessel identification and tracking security initiatives.

CCG has a long and proud history of providing service in the Arctic and to Northern Canadians. Every year, from late June to early November, Coast Guard deploys one light, two heavy, and three medium icebreakers to the Arctic. In addition to the officers and crew that operate these icebreakers, close to 70 other CCG employees are assigned to Northern operations on a seasonal basis.

The Canadian Coast Guard is one of the most identifiable symbols of a Canadian presence, reinforcing both Canadian Arctic sovereignty through the presence of Coast Guard personnel and assets in Canada's North, and CCG's specific roles in Northern marine shipping. As well, alongside the activities of other parts of DFO, the Coast Guard advances the goals of the government's Northern Strategy, and keeps Arctic waterways open, safe, and clean. A number of CCG initiatives are underway:

  • Budget 2007 provided the Coast Guard with $2.2 million in funding over three years to enhance Canada's capacity to respond to marine oil spills that occur in the Arctic. In 2009-2010, Coast Guard completed the acquisition of the necessary environmental response equipment packages and started to distribute them in the North.
  • Also in 2007, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) confirmed Canada in its role as international coordinator and issuing service for navigational warnings for two Navigational Areas (NAVAREAs) in the Arctic. NAVAREAS are established geographical areas within which the broadcast of navigational warnings to mariners and communities is coordinated. In 2009-2010, Coast Guard finalized the planning of this international service. With Budget 2010 providing the Coast Guard with $2.2 million, over two years, we plan to start the initial testing phase of the service in the summer of 2010. We will launch the NAVAREA transmission service in 2011-2012.
  • With the implementation of the Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) System, CCG is currently the only significant collector of vessel traffic information in the Arctic. Through LRIT, CCG is capable of tracking vessels north of 84 degrees. This unique capacity positions CCG as an essential contributor to Arctic marine safety and security.
  • In 2008, the government made the decision to replace Coast Guard's most capable Arctic icebreaker, CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent, built in 1969, and to decommission it in 2017. Budget 2008 provided $720 million for the procurement of a new Polar Icebreaker, which is being designed with greater icebreaking capabilities than the one it is replacing, allowing it to operate for longer periods in the Arctic. This new vessel will allow the Coast Guard to more efficiently continue its work to strengthen and protect Canada's sovereignty in the Arctic.

In support of the government's current and future Northern Strategy, and as part of ensuring a strategic approach to its own activities, the Coast Guard is formalizing an integrated approach to its roles in the Arctic. A strategic priority for DFO and CCG in 2010-2011 is developing integrated Arctic strategies for DFO and the Coast Guard, while ensuring continued implementation of current Northern initiatives. This will enable both DFO and CCG to better fulfil their important roles in the government-wide Northern priority, and better meet obligations to oceans users, Northerners, and international partners and stakeholders.

 Commitment

 Lead

2010-2011

 

Establish Arctic visions and integrated short-run and long-run objectives and priorities for DFO and CCG.

Executive Director, Arctic Strategies

Directorate

Environmental Management Framework

As part of DFO’s 2007-2009 Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS), CCG made specific, voluntary commitments to improve environmental outcomes for Canadians by reducing its own environmental footprint and developing a health, safety and environmental management system.  Through the use of standards and specifications, Coast Guard will take the lead in the green acquisition and operation of both marine and shore-side infrastructure.  

Specifically, CCG has committed to:

  • Developing an Environmental Management Framework for internal operations that will establish the principles and considerations necessary to begin addressing requirements for reducing air emissions (including greenhouse gas), as well as other greening of government initiatives;
  • Developing a set of industry-leading, environmental and sustainability standards and specifications that incorporate modern environmental practices and technology, as well as national and international best practices, into the procurement of new CCG assets; and
  • Leveraging the experience and knowledge of CCG and other organizations to conduct a baseline survey of the physical assets and operations of CCG to establish a benchmark of their environmental sustainability and eco-efficiency.

In addition, in order to put into practice DFO’s Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) and environmental programs, CCG has committed to developing and implementing a Health, Safety and Environmental (HSE) Compliance System for shore-side equipment, facilities, and operations.  This involves developing and implementing standard practices and procedures, giving CCG the ability to demonstrate compliance with OHS and environmental regulations.

In 2009-2010, a draft Environmental Management Framework was completed.

Commitment

In response to…

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Develop the HSE Compliance System framework.

 

DG, ITS

Deputy Commissioner, Operations

Develop a guiding framework evaluation matrix that builds on the Environmental Management Framework.

SDS

DG, ITS

 

Develop procedures to matrix activities supporting CCG green procurement policies and possibly refits as well as the construction of new ships.

SDS

DG, ITS

2011-2012

 

 

Develop a set of industry-leading, environmental and sustainability standards and specifications.

SDS

DG, ITS with the support of the DG, MCP

Conduct a baseline survey of CCG’s physical assets and operations to establish a benchmark of their environmental sustainability and eco-efficiency.

SDS

DG, ITS

Strategic Review

The Government of Canada introduced a new expenditure management system in 2007 as part of an ongoing commitment to better manage government spending. This system ensures value for money for all government spending. A key pillar of this system is Strategic Review (SR), the assessment on a four-year cycle of all direct program spending. Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), including Coast Guard, was asked to conduct a Strategic Review in 2010.  

In alignment with the priorities set out in the recent Speech from the Throne and Budget 2010, our Department’s Strategic Review will aim to:

  • Increase efficiency and effectiveness by examining ways the Department can improve or modernize the delivery of its programs and services;
  • Enhance our focus on core roles by ensuring that all departmental programs and services are delivered by those best positioned to do so; and
  • Meet the priorities of Canadians by better aligning departmental programs and services with the needs of Canadians.

Strategic Review is an opportunity for CCG to refine its common vision of the future. We are well positioned to undertake this review as a result of our Levels of Service (LOS) review, the e-Navigation user needs surveys, the SAR Needs Analysis, and our work on the Strategic Program Framework, which we completed in 2009. We will build on this knowledge to ensure a successful review of our programs and spending in 2010-2011. 

Our efforts to date to prepare the organization for SR have been significant, and they will continue through to Fall 2010. Coordination within DFO will be essential to preparing the Department’s recommendations for consideration in the government’s 2011 budget planning processes.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Conduct CCG’s Strategic Review, as part of the larger DFO SR process.

DG, MS

Research and Development Strategy

The Coast Guard is committed to developing a CCG-wide culture of innovation. Through the overarching umbrella of a CCG Innovation Strategy, we will ensure our culture, management, and processes foster innovation, creative thinking, and knowledge sharing. The Coast Guard recognizes Research and Development (R&D) and innovation as mutually reinforcing. Recent project successes include work related to Oil Dispersion in Ice-Encumbered Waters and the development of the Under Keel Clearance prediction model.

In 2009-2010, with the introduction of a new mission statement, Coast Guard focused on starting the development of its Innovation Strategy by establishing a collaborative ginger1 group.  This interregional and interprogram team completed the analysis necessary to present realistic recommendations on a way forward to CCG’s Management Board. These recommendations, focusing on the three pillars of Leadership, Culture, and the R&D Program, are aimed at invoking innovative thinking in all facets of Coast Guard’s operational, technical, and business functions. The results will benefit all of CCG.

CCG’s focus in 2010-2011 will be on creating a CCG R&D Strategy to ensure supportive and stable R&D services. This will include using streamlined processes for the approval, funding, and reporting of CCG R&D projects, as well as integrating R&D planning into Coast Guard's integrated planning cycle. It is anticipated that this will support innovation in a variety of areas, such as e-Navigation. This initiative was identified in the 2009-2012 Coast Guard Business Plan as a way of improving the way we do business both operationally and strategically. In developing the R&D Strategy, we will look at various internal funding options while building on Coast Guard's recognition of the importance of using partnerships to leverage R&D investment.

For details on CCG 2010-2011 R&D projects, see Annex B.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Develop a CCG strategy for Research and Development.

DG, MS

2011-2012

 

Launch the new R&D Strategy for CCG.

DG, MS

1 A ginger group is a formal or informal grouping of people within a larger organization that actively works for more radical change to the policies, practices, or office holders of the organization while still supporting the goals of the organization.