Text Description of Image: Figure 4-6 - Distress and safety radiotelephone procedures

(To request a copy of TP 9878: http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/publications-marine-abstracts-598.html)

TO BE DISPLAYED BESIDE RADIOTELEPHONE

DISTRESS PROCEDURES

For use only when in grave and imminent danger and IMMEDIATE ASSISTANCE is required.

  1. Send DSC Alert
  2. Send distress call on VHF CH16
  3. Activate EPIRB

1. Send DSC Alert

Ensure radio is switched on. Press and hold the red “distress” button for 5 seconds.

2. Send distress call on VHF CH16

Switch to VHF CH16 and transmit distress call and message:

MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY

THIS IS (Vessel name 3 times)

MAYDAY followed by vessel name and MMSI number

POSITION

NATURE OF DISTRESS

AID REQUIRED

NUMBER OF PERSONS ON BOARD

If outside of VHF coverage, send the distress message on 2182 kHz or use other suitable means of communication.

3. Activate EPIRB

Activate EPIRB (or PLB) by following directions printed on beacon body.

Take EPIRB with you to the survival craft.

Ensure EPIRB is vertical, with antenna pointed upward.

Before Departing

  • Have you left a sail plan with a responsible person ashore?
  • Does your voyage plan take into consideration adverse weather, navigational hazards and fuel requirements?
  • Have you verifi ed that your radio equipment is operational?
  • Have you charged and checked any batteries used to power radio equipment for emergency communications?
  • If equipped with VHF-DSC (Digital Selective Calling), do you have a valid MMSI* number and have you connected the radio to your GPS?
  • If equipped with an EPIRB, have you registered* your EPIRB with the Canadian beacon registry?
  • Do you have suitable visual distress signals onboard? (fl ares, signaling light, etc)

Early Alerting of SAR

Transport Canada strongly recommends you report, without delay, any situation that has the potential to constitute a danger to life. Time lost in the initial stages of a potential distress incident cannot be regained and may be crucial to the outcome. See example for
URGENCY (PAN PAN) message.

Distress, Urgency and Safety Signals

MAYDAY means a mobile unit or person is threatened by grave and imminent danger and requests immediate assistance.

MAYDAY RELAY means the calling station is relaying a distress message on behalf of a mobile unit or person is threatened by grave and imminent danger.

PAN PAN means the calling station has a very urgent message to transmit concerning the safety of a mobile unit or a person.

SÉCURITÉ ÉCURITÉ means the calling station has an important navigational or meteorological warning to transmit.

Canceling a False VHF-DSC Distress Alert

Transmit on VHF CH16: All stations, All stations, All stations, this is (vessel name) MMSI number, position, North, West, Cancel my distress alert of date and time. This is (vessel name) MMSI number , Out.

Phonetic Alphabet

A Alfa I India Q Quebec Y Yankee

B Bravo J Juliet R Romeo Z Zulu

C Charlie K Kilo S Sierra

D Delta L Lima T Tango

E Echo M Mike U Uniform

F Foxtrot N November V Victor

G Golf O Oscar W Whiskey

H Hotel P Papa X X-Ray

EXAMPLE OF DISTRESS PROCEDURE (MAYDAY)

Press distress alert button followed by distress message “MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY, This is NONSUCH, NONSUCH, NONSUCH. MAYDAY NONSUCH MMSI 316999999, position 49° 04.6’ North 123° 18.8’ West. Ship has taken on water and in danger of capsizing, I require immediate assistance, 4 persons on board, are taking to liferaft, Over.”

EXAMPLE OF URGENCY PROCEDURE (PAN PAN)

“PAN PAN, PAN PAN, PAN PAN, St. John’s Coast Guard Radio, St. John’s Coast Guard Radio, St. John’s Coast Guard Radio, This is NONSUCH, NONSUCH, NONSUCH. 

MMSI 316999999, 5 miles East of Cape Bonavista, we have taken on water in lazarette and are presently trying to pump out excess water, Over”.